Category Archives: Flash

Ludum Dare 24

future rabbit by eric decker and erin gregory

Ludum Dare is a quarterly rapid game development competition/event. You essentially have 48 to 36 hours to make a game from scratch based on a theme announced at the start, which is usually 9:00 PM on Friday. If you participate in the compo, you have just the 2 days to create everything yourself – code, design, audio, etc. The more relaxed jam gives you 36 hours, lets you work in a team, and is more lenient on the usage of  open source libraries, etc. After submission the community plays and votes for their favorites in multiple categories such as graphics, mood, humor, etc.

For my first jam, I worked with my fiancée to create a short game. I naturally did the game development in AS3, and Erin hand-made all the graphics as actual cross-stitch, even down to the font. This round’s theme was Evolution, and there were 1406 entries, 400 of them in the Jam. I will admit, however, the concept based on the theme is a bit of a stretch.

You can check out our entry here and read the post-mortem here. It was a lot of fun and we even managed to tie for 10th place for Graphics!

Continue reading

Video Sync Issues with Flash AS3

It’s been almost a year exactly since my last update. I guess I’ve been pretty preoccupied. I wanted to do a post about an age old problem very often encountered in Flash – compositing video so that overlaying elements sync perfectly with a video. In essence, getting the true current frame of an FLV or F4V. Specifically the problem I want to talk about tackling is having an image be composited as if it were in the video. I think a great example of this is a site we (as in Firstborn, not me) did for 5 React a year or so ago. There are a couple of solutions to solve this problem that work almost perfectly 99% of the time. In general, they usually involve an XML file that contains corner points for each frame of how an image should be transformed to match the video. For live video (no CG) tracking is set up in After Effects and then the cue points are exported. While After Effects doesn’t have a native export cue points as XML option, the keyframe data can be copied & pasted out as plain text, and then you can just run a simple RegEx to convert it to XML. This is all pretty simple and isn’t the problem, the issue lies with not being able to get the exact frame that a video is displaying.

after-effects-cue-points Continue reading

Doritos.com

Just a quick update here, we recently relaunched the new Doritos.com [edit: no longer online], my latest project. I was lead developer on this project with much help from Lucas Motta and Michael Roushey on the flash forefront, and as always Francis Turmel as our technical Sensei. The project was done with the world renowned ad agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners. We put a lot of hours into this site, but I think it was worth it. My job as lead developer was doing the overall structure and framework of the site. I also developed some helpful debugging utils along the way, which I hope to post on here rather soon.

Continue reading

NanoTween

Recently I was working on preloader for a project and needed to use a tweening engine. (We have an internally developed one at Firstborn that is based off of the syntax of Tweener). I wanted to see if I could write my own that would be super small. I wasn’t as concerned with performance – meaning being able to tween thousands of objects at once, a highly unlikely scenario anyways. I wanted to keep compiled file size down, as well as number of classes. So I created a NanoTween class that is a super simple tweening utility. When compiled on it’s own, it only consist of about 1.3 Kb.

Continue reading

Speaking at FITC Toronto 2010

So I realize this is pretty last minute, but I’ll be speaking at FITC Toronto this Monday with Mathieu Badimon. We’ll be speaking on Firstborn’s behalf. Our presentation is titled “Tools & Prototypes: Crafting a Unique Digital Experience.” It’s basically focusing on how for each project we make, we usually need to make demos to test techniques or make tools to aid in development. It’s more of a creative presentation than a technical one, as we really won’t be talking about code directly. So if you’re up at FITC this weekend, we’ll be presenting Monday at 12:10.

fitc-2010-presenting Continue reading

Time Displacement Experiment (part II)

I made some updates to my time displacement experiments. I lumped them all into one nice little app, as well as give some options to toggle the effect. I also added the option to choose video source, so it doesn’t have to be with a webcam anymore. I added the option to tint what area is being effected, as well as experimented with frame blending to try to lessen hard edges. Like the previous post, I’m still using Pixel Bender to apply the displacement.

experiments.eric-decker.com/time_displacement

time-painting-app-example-1

Continue reading

More Time Displacement Experiments: Now with Pixel Bender

I decided to try using Pixel Bender to do the time displacement in the recent experiments I’ve been doing, as I was hoping it would perform better. It actually seems to, but there still is a significant lag. However, I’m pretty sure this is because of having to make a huge sprite sheet first.

I basically make a huge sprite sheet of all the frames I have saved. Since Flash 10 lets you have bigger bitmaps (16,777,215 pixels total, max dimension at 8,191 src) I can create a large image that tiles all the frames I currently have saved. I can have a max of 12 frames across (at 640) and 4 frames down (at 480). So after I create/update this giant bitmap, I send it to a pixel bender filter that is currently applied to a gray scale image. The Pixel Bender filter then looks at each pixel, evaluates the brightness and interpolates it to what frame it needs to update from, then replaces the current pixel with the appropriate one from the selected frame.

These experiments are still a little rough, but I’ll post ’em anyways. No videos yet, I need to find some time to do screen recordings. The ticker is obviously by Mr. Doob. You’ll need a webcam for all of these, sorry.

  • brightness: Displacement based off of brightness of current frame.
  • movement: Displacement based off of movement (difference between frames)
  • painting: Displacement based off area pained by user, as in previous post (inspired by Smudge City).
  • noise: Displacement based off of perlin noise.
  • filmstrip: Displacement based off of titled blocks.

In any of these experiments, you can right-click to show the source that is controlling the displacement.

Video Time Painting Experiment

I started playing around with doing some experiments with video and time delay. When showing the previously mentioned JPEG video experiment to my coworker Roushey, he mentioned how just the effect of the time delay was interesting. I was thinking about neat things to do with, and the first idea I had was to offset each frame as one row or column of pixels. So in a 640 x 480 video, the left-most column of pixels would be from the current frame, and the last rightmost column would be from 639 frames ago. The experiment is live here, and there’s a video of it on YouTube.

Continue reading

‘Encoding’ Video as JPEG real time in AS3

A few days ago I was thinking if there was a way to reproduce the effect of JPEG compression real time in flash. I figured the best way would be to literally encode the image with the native AS3 JPEGEncoder class. The problem there was that the returned ByteArray could not be interpreted as an image anymore. However, the Loader class does allow for loading a ByteArray and converting it to a Bitmap. And luckily, the loadBytes method let us load the ByteArray right from Flash (as opposed to having to save out a file and load it externally).

Continue reading